Musée des beaux-arts, Limoges

Visited on 15th June 2017

The Museum of Fine Arts of Limoges is in the former Episcopal Palace in Limoges.

Created in 1912 , the museum houses collections related to the history of Limoges. It also has Egyptian antiquities, Romanesque and Gothic sculptures.

Address: 1 Place de l’Évêché, 87000 Limoges, France

Opening Hours: Monday, Wednesday thru Saturday: 9:30am–12pm, 2–5pm.

Sunday     2–5pm. Tuesdays:  Closed

 

Telephone: +33 5 55 45 98 10

Website: http://www.museebal.fr/

http://www.culture-en-limousin.fr/Musee-des-Beaux-Arts-de-Limoges-Palais-de-L-Eveche-254

Entrance Fee: Adult 5 Euros 3 Euros Concessions

Photography is permitted without flash

There are toilet facilities and a cloakroom next to the Reception.

EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES

Jean André Périchon was a Limousin manufacturer who spent his career in Middle Egypt in the early 20th century.

He generously bequeathed the sumptuous collection of Egyptian antiquities, representing approximately 2000 pieces, to the Museum.

As you descend the stairs immediately to your left is the Egyptian Room housing ten cabinets, the first houses wonderful Egyptian models of boats, workers, farmers etc..

Housed in the museum is a replica of the funerary tomb of the official Nakht, who was an ‘astronomer’ (Astronomer of Amun), scribe, and priest during the reign of Tutmoses IV, during the 18th Dynasty He is buried in the Theban Necropolis, in tomb TT52.

His tomb is TT 52 on the west bank. It is located within the area of the Abd el-Qurna necropolis. It was apparently discovered by villagers at Qurna prior to being cleared by the Antiquities Service in 1889. In 1917, an English Egyptologists named Norman de Garis Davies and his wife, Nina published information on the tomb which received worldwide attention.

Further details can be found at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TT52

The Detailed Sarcophagus of Iré-Hor-Irou.End of the Late Period or early Ptolemaic period, Stuccoed and painted wood, 195 cm along with funerary masks and canopic jars.

Below is a Third Intermediate period cartonnage mask.

Cabinets housing pottery, jewellery, shabtis, grave god amulets and items used in daily life, religion and death.

Full Photo Collection at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/127735911@N08/albums/72157682883024781

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